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Why should I teach Java out of Visual Studio Code instead of out of Eclipse or Netbeans?

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 22:39
Why should I teach Java out of Visual Studio Code instead of out of Eclipse or Netbeans?

 

1. Easier File Mapping 

 

In Visual Studio, we can add a file from a path to a project located in a workspace, and Visual Studio records the reference to a new file and opens it like any other file. But, in Eclipse and Netbeans, the structure of a project's elements must correspond to their layout in the underlying file system.

 

2. File Size & Download Speed - 3X Better!

 

Eclipse is 166 MB to download for Java. Even more for the other versions! To download the Java EE version of NetBeans, it's 186 MB. And it's 205 MB for all four languages. Now compare that to Visual Studio Code, which is only 58 MB for all 34 languages! Imagine having to wait three times longer per download/install on each computer in your school! And then downloading and installing the new versions for each of those machines!

 

3. No Plugins for Other Languages

 

Unlike Eclipse, in Visual Studio Code, you don't need a plugin to use other languages, like C#, F#, HTML5, Python, and Ruby. You can transition quickly to other languages!

 

4. Exposure to Other Languages - 8X More Languages!

 

Java is important, but it should just be one language on the road to learning computer science! Eclipse only has Java (out of the box), and NetBeans only has 4 languages out of the box (Java, C++, HTML5, and PHP). But Visual Studio Code includes 34 languages out of the box! (Java, C#, C++, HTML5, PHP, VB, CSS, XML, JavaScript, Python, Ruby, Go, Perl, R, SQL, JSON, F#, PowerShell, and more!) And if it doesn't have your language, it's far easier to add it into Visual Studio Code than the other IDEs!

  

Comparison

Wikipedia

  
Languages Out of the Box

  • Eclipse: 1 (Java)
  • NetBeans: 4 (C++, HTML5, Java, PHP)
  • Visual Studio Code: 34 (Batch, C#, C++, Clojure, CoffeeScript, CSS, DockerFile, F#, Go, HandleBars, HTML5, Ini, Jade, Java, JavaScript, JSON, Less, Lua, Makefile, Markdown, Objective-C, Perl, PHP, PowerShell, Python, R, Razor, Ruby, Rust, Sass, SQL, TypeScript, Visual Basic, XML)

File Size

  • Eclipse: At least 166 MB
  • Netbeans: 205 MB
  • Visual Studio Code: 58 MB

 

Questions for You
  1. Did I get everything accurate? If anything isn't 100% accurate, please reply and explain why!
  2. Could any of the reasons use better clarifications or explanations/details? Please reply with the info!
  3. Are there any reasons to teach Java in Visual Studio Code that I missed? Reply with the reasons!
  4. Any reasons not to teach Java on Visual Studio Code?

 

Thank you for reading! Please reply with your answers to any of the four questions above!

 

Have a day! Not just any day! Have this one!

   - Ninja Ed

Investigating issues with Cloud Load Test Service- 2/6 - Investigating

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 21:32
Initial Update: Saturday, 6 February 2016 05:29 UTC

We are actively investigating issues with Cloud Load Test in VS Team Services. A small subset of customers in Australia region may experience internal server error in accessing Cloud Load Test service.

We are working to resolve this issue and apologize for any inconvenience.

Sincerely,
VS Team Services Service Delivery Team

IoT & Marketing

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 21:08
The Internet of Things will enable us to get data & insights that was not available till now. It will trigger a massive influx of Big Data. This goldmine of data in conjunction with the proprietary, public and purchased data represents a turning point for marketing. I had the opportunity to discuss Iot and its impact on Marketing at the recent Data Marketing Conference in Toronto. Thank you Palma for the invitation. Here are the slides that I used for the presentation:...(read more)

Why did my Azure Stream Analytics services get into "Degraded" status?

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 17:51

At Azure Stream Analytics we get asked from time to time this question - why is my stream analytics services showing the status "degraded" . We are bringing back an old post up again to answer this :)

User wants to know:
- what can be the problem that causes “Degraded” status
- is there a way I can set notifications or alarms on stream analytics (status change, too many events etc.)
- is there a way to examine logs of stream analytics and see what caused the problem

The answers to above questions can be found here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/streamanalytics/archive/2015/06/29/intro-to-diagnostics-for-azure-stream-analytics.aspx

Encoding 101 - Exporting from SQL Server into flat files, to create a Hive external table

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 16:33

Today in Microsoft Big Data Support we faced the issue of how to correctly move Unicode data from SQL Server into Hive via flat text files. The main issue faced was encoding special Unicode characters from the source database, such as the degree sign (Unicode 00B0) and other complex Unicode characters outside of A-Z 0-9.

The goal was to get Hive to read those same strings SQL Server had saved out to text files and represent them equally to the Hive consumer. We could have used Sqoop if there was a connection between Hadoop and the SQL Server, but that was not possible, as this was across company boundaries and shipping files was the easier approach.

It was tricky to do, but we found a couple of solutions. When the Unicode string value is exported from Microsoft SQL Server via SSIS or the Import Export wizard, they look fine to the naked eye, but SELECT * FROM HiveTable; and the data looks different.

Microsoft SQL Server: zyx°°° Looks good

Hive: zyx��� Uh-oh! We've got trouble.

 

That Unicode string (NVARCHAR) value in SQL appears as zyx°°° We Export that data to a flat file using SSIS or the Import Export Wizard, then copy the files into Azure Blob Storage. Next using Azure HDInsight, when a Hive table is created atop those files, then the same characters look garbled black question marked - zyx��� as if the characters are unknown to Hive's interpretation.

Linux and Hive default to text files encoded to UTF-8 format. That differs from the SSIS Flat File Destination's Unicode output.

I found two ways we found to make them compatible.

  1. Change the export options in SQL Server SSIS Flat File Destination to uncheck the "Unicode" checkmark and select code page 65001 (UTF-8) instead.
  2. Keep the Unicode encoding as is in SSIS, but tell Hive to interpret the data differently using serdeproperties ('serialization.encoding'='ISO-8859-1');

 

Time for a little trial and error 1. Setup an example Database

These are the steps I used to see the issue. You can use SQL Server (any version from 2005-2016).

Using SQL Management Studio, I create a database TestHive and table T1 in SQL Server. Insert some data into the NVarchar column, including some special characters. NChar and NVarChar and NVarChar(max) are the double-byte Unicode data type in SQL Server columns, that are used for global language support.

CREATE DATABASE TestHive

GO

USE TestHive

GO

CREATE TABLE T1(Col1 Int, Col2 NVarchar(255));

GO

INSERT INTO T1 VALUES

(1,N'abcdef'),

(2,N'zyx°°°'),

(3,N'123456' )

GO

SELECT * FROM T1

 

2. Run the SQL Server Import Export Wizard from the Start menu to copy the rows into a text file.

 

On the Source – point to your SQL Server instance, and select the database and table you want to pull from.

On the Destination – choose Flat File Destination, point to a file path on the local disk, and Select the Unicode checkbox on the locale.

You could use the same Flat File Destination from within an Integration Services (SSIS) package design and run that if you prefer more control on how the data is transformed in the Data Flow Task, but the Import Export Wizard does the simple copy that we need here.

This is the output – so far looks good.

3. Connect to my Azure HDInsight cluster in the cloud to upload the file.

 

I used a Linux based HDInsight Hadoop cluster, so I will use SSH to connect to the head node.

Then I create a directory, and upload the first file into that location in blob store. This is much like saving the file from the local disk into HDFS for the purposes of Hadoop outside of Azure.

hadoop fs -mkdir -p /tutorials/usehive/import1/

hadoop fs -copyFromLocal tableexport_ssisunicode.txt wasb:///tutorials/usehive/import1/tableexport_ssisunicode.txt

You could also upload the files directly to Azure Blob Storage from tools such as Visual Studio Azure VS 2015 / VS 2013 or Microsoft Azure Storage Explorer / Azure Storage Explorer or Cloud Explorer for Visual Studio 2013

 

4. Run Hive to read that first folder

Now that the text file is ready in Blob storage, I can run Hive and create a table, and query from that file saved into the import1 folder. From my SSH session I simply run hive.

cd /bin

hive

{

DROP TABLE Import1;

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE Import1(col1 string, col2 string) ROW FORMAT DELIMITED

FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' STORED AS TEXTFILE LOCATION '/tutorials/usehive/import1/' tblproperties ("skip.header.line.count"="1");

SELECT * FROM Import1;

}

 

Notice the strange characters ��� where I expected my degree signs.

Just to be sure it's not something special with my SSH client (MobaXTerm here) I am trying from the Ambari web dashboard for my Azure HDInsight Cluster, and using the Hive View from the menu icon in the upper right.

 

5. OK let's try exporting again – this time changing the flat file encoding setting.

In the SSIS Import Export Wizard (SSIS Flat File Destination) choose code page UTF-8.

- Uncheck the "Unicode" checkmark.

- Choose code page 65001 (UTF-8)

 

6. Upload that second file to Linux (SFTP) and then copy into HDFS or Azure Blob Storage.

I made a new folder, so I could compare my trials side-by-side.

hadoop fs -mkdir -p /tutorials/usehive/import2/

hadoop fs -copyFromLocal tableexport_ssisunicode2.txt wasb:///tutorials/usehive/import2/tableexport_ssisunicode2.txt

 

7. Now test the Hive table again with the UTF-8 encoded file in the second folder

Run Hive

cd /bin

hive

{

DROP TABLE Import2;

CREATE EXTERNAL TABLE Import2(col1 string, col2 string) ROW FORMAT DELIMITED

FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' STORED AS TEXTFILE LOCATION '/tutorials/usehive/import2/' tblproperties ("skip.header.line.count"="1");

SELECT * FROM Import2;

QUIT;

}

My zyx°°° looks normal now! Success!

 

The Hive View in Ambari likes this data too.
 

8. An alternative- Tell hive to encode / decode the external files differently

Perhaps you don't want to change the file format to UTF-8 (most universal in Linux and Hadoop), or maybe you cannot change the format at all, because the files come from an outsider.

Starting in Hive 0.14 version and above, Hive has a simple way to change the encoding of serialization (for interpreting the bytes encoding in text files for example).

The change was explained here https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/HIVE-7142

 

1. You can Create from scratch with this code page serializer and override the serialization.encoding property to a code page that best matches your source data encoding.

CREATE TABLE person(id INT, name STRING, desc STRING)
ROW FORMAT SERDE 'org.apache.hadoop.hive.serde2.lazy.LazySimpleSerDe' WITH SERDEPROPERTIES("serialization.encoding"='ISO-8859-1');

 

2. Or if you have an existing table, this can be adjusted after the fact. You need to carefully match your encoding to whatever kind of files will be presented in the storage underneath this Hive table.

Choose one, or make your own…

ALTER TABLE Import1 SET serdeproperties ('serialization.encoding'='US-ASCII');
ALTER TABLE Import1 SET serdeproperties ('serialization.encoding'='ISO-8859-1');
ALTER TABLE Import1 SET serdeproperties ('serialization.encoding'='UTF-8');

 

To find out which tokens to list next to the equal sign, refer to the Charset code ID is listed in Java documentation
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/nio/charset/Charset.html

I am guessing the right one is this one to match SQL's "Unicode" but it needs to be tested further to be totally sure that ALL characters are interpreted as expected.

ISO-8859-1  

ISO Latin Alphabet No. 1, a.k.a. ISO-LATIN-1

 

Other tips we didn't have time to try yet:

Someone made a tool to help convert files if it is not possible for them to change the format in SSIS or BCP exports to text files. https://code.msdn.microsoft.com/windowsdesktop/UTF8WithoutBOM-Converter-7a8218af

 

Hope this helps someone out there. Let us know if it does, or if you still get stuck, post a comment below, or try the Azure forums for help.

 

Happy Hadooping! Jason 

Unicode Math Calligraphic Alphabets

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 15:54

Unicode needs a way to encode bold and regular math Calligraphic/Chancery alphabets as well as bold and regular script alphabets, since it turns out that Calligraphic and Script alphabets are used contrastively by some authors and [La]TeX has had both kinds of letters. In most documents, Script and Calligraphic shapes can be substituted for one other pretty much as a choice of font. Accordingly when the math alphanumeric symbols were added to Unicode, the two shapes were unified. But since then we have come to realize that the two kinds of shapes aren’t always interchangeable and that we need a way to distinguish calligraphic from script in the same document. This proposal discusses two ways to do this is spite of the quandary that some math fonts have calligraphic letters at the existing math script code points, while others and the Unicode Standard have real script letters at those code points.

First, here’s an example of script and calligraphic F’s being used in the same document:

And here are examples featuring P’s and C’s in which script letters denote infinity categories

 Accordingly the need for both script and calligraphic alphabets is attested.

Let’s turn now to the unfortunate fact that the current math script alphabets may be fancy script in one font and calligraphic in another. Cambria Math, the first widely used Unicode math font, has calligraphic letters at the math script code points, while STIX and the Unicode Standard have fancy script letters at those code points. For example, here’s the upper-case math script H (U+210B) in Cambria Math followed by the one in STIX:

We really can’t change Cambria Math’s math script alphabet choice at this late stage in computing history; too many documents use it. Consequently it is inadequate to add only bold and regular Calligraphic alphabets, expecting the current bold and regular script alphabets to fulfil the need for bold and regular math script alphabets. Unfortunately, the latter are deliberately ambiguous with respect to calligraphic versus script.

There are two unambiguous ways to allow math script and math calligraphic symbols to appear in the same plain text document:

1)      Follow a character in the current math script alphabets with one of two variation selectors similar to the way we use variation selectors (U+FE0E, U+FE0F) for emoji to force text and emoji glyphs, respectively. Specifically, to ensure use of the math calligraphic alphabet, follow the current math script letter with U+FE00. To ensure use of the math fancy script alphabet, follow the current math script letters with U+FE01.

2)      Add four new unambiguous math alphabets: bold and regular, fancy script and calligraphic, leaving the current math script alphabets as ambiguous.

The variation selector choice has the advantages

a)       Contemporary software supports variation sequences for East Asia and emoji, so adding new variation sequences shouldn’t be much of a burden

b)      The variation selector U+FE00 is already used with a number of math operators

c)       No new code points need to be allocated

d)      Typical documents can continue to do what they have been doing: ignore the distinction

e)       If a math font doesn’t support the variation sequences, it falls back naturally to the current script/calligraphic letters instead of displaying the missing-glyph box

These advantages together with the fact that the majority of documents don’t require a script/calligraphic distinction seem to make the variation selector approach preferable. Adding two variation selectors for the math script letters may make people ask why the math alphabets weren't implemented with variation selectors in the first place. They were considered, but the Unicode Technical Committee was concerned that people might misuse them to encode rich-text properties which are not the domain of plain text. Adding two variation selectors seems to solve the present calligraphic quandary quite well, although the use of variation selectors is generally a poor one for situations where symbol shapes need to be used in a contrastive manner. This case should therefore not serve as a general precedent, but should be seen as an exception, tailored to fit this specific case.

In fact, LaTeX has the \mathsf{} and \mathsfit{} control words for math sans serif upright and italic characters, respectively, and they work with Greek letters. Unlike the calligraphic/script distinction which is seldom used contrastively, upright and italic are usually used contrastively in mathematics. Unicode has normal weight upright and italic sans serif math alphabets corresponding to the ASCII letters, but not for the Greek letters. Accordingly, these two math Greek alphabets will probably be added, perhaps in the range U+1D3F80..U+1D3FF. This range has been reserved for math alphanumeric symbols and immediately precedes the Mathematical Alphanumeric Symbols block at U+1D400..U+1D7FF.

It might also be worthwhile for programs like Word to have a math document-level property that specifies which script/calligraphic alphabet to use for the whole document. Then a user who wants the fancy script glyphs could get them without making any changes except for choosing the desired document property setting. A similar setting could be used for choosing sans serif alphabets as the default. It appears such alphabets are often used in chemical formulas.

The choice of calligraphic glyphs for the math script letters in Cambria Math is partly my fault. I had expected to see fancy script letters in Cambria Math as in the Unicode code charts. In my physics career I used math script letters a lot, starting with my PhD thesis on laser theory (1967) and followed by many published papers in the Physical Review and elsewhere and in my three books on lasers and quantum optics. Occasionally in a review article, calligraphic letters were substituted for the fancy script letters because the publishers didn’t have the latter. And in the early days, the IBM Selectric Script ball and the script daisy wheels only had calligraphic letters. So I kind of got used to this substitution.

In addition, Cambria Math was designed partly to look really good on screens, which didn’t have the resolution to display the narrow stem widths of Times New Roman and fancy script letters well. ClearType rendering certainly helped, but it seemed like a good idea to use less resolution demanding calligraphic letters. (Later Word 2013 disabled ClearType for various reasons and many readers of this blog have complained passionately ever since! With high resolution screens as on my Samsung laptop or the Surface Book, even Times New Roman looks crisp and nice with only gray-scale antialiasing, so hopefully this problem will diminish in time.) In contrast, it’s appropriate that the STIX font, based on Times Roman with its narrow glyph stems, would have the fancy script glyphs. With the mechanism described here, people could use calligraphic and script letters contrastively in the same document (assuming the fonts add the missing glyphs).

 

 

 

Encoding worries in Azure HDInsight when using Hive

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 14:33

Today at Microsoft we were using Azure Data Factory to run Hive Activities in Azure HDInsight on a schedule. Things were working fine for a while, but then we got an error that was hard to understand. I've simplified the scenario to illustrate the key points. The key is that Hive did not like the Byte Order Mark (first 3 bytes) in the hive .hql file, and failed with an error. Be careful which text editor and text encoding you choose when saving your Hive Query Language (HQL) command into a text file.

We are using Azure Data Factory (Feb 2016) with a linked service to Microsoft Azure HDInsight Hadoop on Linux (version 3.2.1000.0) which is the distribution from Hortonworks Data Platform version 2.2.7.1-36 and includes Hive 0.14.0.

Error message:

Hive script failed with exit code '64'. See 'wasb://adfjobs@mycontainer.blob.core.windows.net/HiveQueryJobs/92994500-5dc2-4ba3-adb8-4fac51c4d959/05_02_2016_05_49_34_516/Status/stderr' for more details.

To drill into that stderror logging, In the Data Factory activity blade, we see the error text, and see the log files below. We click on the stderr file and read it in the log blade.

Stderr says:

WARNING: Use "yarn jar" to launch YARN applications.

Logging initialized using configuration in jar:file:/mnt/resource/hadoop/yarn/local/filecache/11/hive.tar.gz/hive/lib/hive-common-1.2.1.2.3.3.1-1.jar!/hive-log4j.properties

FAILED: ParseException line 1:0 character '' not supported here

That's strange, because the Hive query file looks fine to the naked eye.

 

If you use a binary editor though you can see these two text files are not the same.

I have Visual Studio handy, and it can show the hex representation of these files.

File > Open > File…

 

Next to the open button there is a drop down – choose "Open with…"

Choose Binary Editor.

 

Notice that file2.hql shown below has 3 extra bytes in the beginning. This is called a byte-order mark (BOM).

The Standards Controversy

There is some controversy about whether UTF-8 text files should have a byte order mark or not.

The standards folks say don't use it in most cases, but also don't remove it if you already have a BOM. We software developers sometimes forget that and are inconsistent -Microsoft Windows vs. Linux vs. Apache Hive

Citing the crowdsourced Wikipedia information here for neutrality:

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte_order_mark

UTF-8 byte order mark is EF BB BF in hex.

The Unicode Standard permits the BOM in UTF-8,[2] but does not require or recommend its use.

The standard also does not recommend removing a BOM when it is there, so that round-tripping between encodings does not lose information, and so that code that relies on it continues to work.

In Linux distributions since around 2004 the convention is to generate UTF-8 files without a BOM.

Microsoft compilers[10] and interpreters, and many pieces of software on Microsoft Windows such as Notepad treat the BOM as a required magic number rather than use heuristics. These tools add a BOM when saving text as UTF-8, and interpret as UTF-8 on reading only when the BOM is present.

 

The Litmus Test

So let's try the two .hql text files in Hive console directly outside of Azure Data Factory to see if they work in Hive alone. I am using SSH to connect to my Linux head node in HDInsight. I have uploaded the two files using SFTP (easy to do in MobaXTerm if you like that 3rd party tool – I can't endorse any specific tool, but seems nice). The source command here is running the query file from within the hive app.

1. First I launch Hive on my SSH session.

Cd /bin Hive

 

2. Then I run the script from the first file. It works well and returns a list of my Hive tables from my metastore.

source /home/sshuser/file1.hql;

 

OK

 

3. Then I run the script from the second file. It fails with a parsing error

source /home/sshuser/file2.hql; FAILED: ParseException line 1:0 character '' not supported here

 

 

 

The lesson learned

So the lesson learned is that Hive doesn't like the .hql text files when they are encoded in UTF-8 with a Byte-order mark up front in the hex/binary.

UTF-8 is the encoding of choice, but the byte-order mark is not desired.

Action Required!

Check your favorite text editor to see if it is marking the BOM or not.

1. Windows Notepad seems to encode UTF-8 files to include a Byte Order Mark, so avoid that one.

 

2. Visual Studio 2013 / 2015 gives you the option to save "With Encoding" on the drop down beside the Save button, then you can pick which Encoding you want.

 

First trial - I picked Unicode (UTF-8 with signature) – Codepage 65001. That "signature" means it adds a BOM, which is undesirable for Hive to interpret.

 

Second trial – I picked Unicode (UTF-8 without signature) - Codepage 65001. Looks better now. That's the one without the BOM in the first three bytes, so Hive should be OK to read this one.

3. Linux's common Vi text editor

The hex representation does not have a BOM, so we are good to use this with Hive.

 

Hive can run this one OK

4. Nano – another easy text editor on Linux

Looks good as well, no BOM

Hive can run this one OK too.

 

To be continued... There are many more text editors, so please let me know if you have trouble with encoding using another text editor when saving Hive queries to text.

Cross Forest Management - (Create groups with FSP's as Members)

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 14:31
Scenario: 2 Forest Contoso Fabrikam Each Forest has Exchange installed Fabrikam needs to allow members of members of groups to access SharePoint Resources Contoso will be the source for all Groups Groups need to be created in the Fabrikam Forest with an updated Display Name and samAccountName to include "SP_" Contoso TestGroup Fabrikam SP_TestGroup Members of Groups in the Fabrikam Forest will contain the "FSP" Foreign Security Principal...(read more)

Small Basic - Invalid Variable Names

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 11:08

This Table shows some illegal variable names, along with the reason why each name’s invalid.

Table: Invalid Variable Names

Variable Name

What’s Wrong?

2Player

starts with a digit

My.Address

has an invalid character (dot) in the name

Okay?

has an invalid character (?) in the name

room-temp

has an invalid character (minus sign) in the name

room*temp

has an invalid character (*) in the name

room temp

has an invalid character (space) in the name

 

If you use an illegal variable name, the Small Basic compiler detects it and reports a syntax error. And then the programming police show up to arrest you! (That last part might just be a rumor.)

 

Head to Download Microsoft Small Basic to get started!

 

Have a Small and Basic day!

   - Ninja Ed & Majed Marji

TechNet Radio mini-series: Windows 10 System Center Configuration Manager vNext

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 11:00

In this two part mini-series, author Blain Barton and Richard Balsley discuss how to deploy Windows 10 in an Enterprise environment using the latest version of System Center Configuration Manager. This content is receiving exceptional reviews on Channel 9–check it out for yourself!

Part 1 of 2 – Windows 10 System Center Configuration Manager VNEXT

  • [1:50] What’s new in Configuration Manager–version 1511?
  • [2:40] How does Configuration Manager help deploy, manage and keep Windows 10 secure?
  • [3:15]  What are my options for getting to Windows 10?
  • [8:25] How should I deploy and manage Windows 10?
  • [11:15] How does the in-place upgrade work in ConfigMan?
  • [17:20] Should I upgrade or refresh?
  • [19:05] What are core operating system deployment scenarios?
  • [21:55] How should I think about my deployment strategy for Windows 10?
  • [26:00] What does Windows 10 management look like through ConfigMan?
  • [29:50] How do you keep Windows up to date?
  • [32:00] What about previous versions of System Center Configuration Manager–will that work with managing Windows 10?

Part 2 of 2 – Windows 10 System Center Configuration Manager VNEXT

  • [0:34] DEMO: New Configuration Manager–version 1511 console
  • [1:40] What does this new Windows 10 Servicing console looks like?
  • [12:40]  What happens if I don’t want to use a servicing plan? What do I use?
  • [17:15] How does an upgrade task sequence work?
  • [20:40] What is post-processing?
  • [23:30] Can you describe the high-risk deployment message box for us?

My experience with USB Rubber Ducky

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 09:39

USB RUBBER Ducky is 

BETT 2016 Guest Blog – HP: Creating meaningful connected learning experiences with Office 365

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 08:30

Microsoft Partner HP, exhibited at BETT 2016. As a premier provider of technology solutions for education, HP showcased their latest education portfolio which is built for especially for schools and designed for learning. Read on to find out how they facilitate anytime anywhere learning with Office 365.

At HP, we believe that a high-quality education is a modern education. One in which students and teachers can create deeply individualised and connected learning experiences, at any time and from anywhere, in the classroom or not. It is only by evolving the way we empower teachers to differentiate instruction and students to learn how they learn best, that we can ensure meaningful learning and positive social and economic outcomes. This will create a brighter future for our whole society.

An example of our investment in Education in the UK&I is our pioneering Digital Schools of Distinction Award, brainchild of Ann Marie Whelan, where we recognise, reward and promote best practice use of technology in education in Scotland further to the success of the programme in the Republic of Ireland. This will Support measures to improve Scotland’s international reputation for technology in education through programme alignment to government policy in the form of a National campaign and to raise public awareness of the importance of technology in education. Collaboration is one of the most promoted benefits of technology in Education and has transformed the dynamics of the classroom such as the Office 365 suite; the way teachers teach and students learn. The Digital Schools of Distinction scheme promotes best practice sharing, collaboration and mind sharing around use of ICT in Education between teachers as being every bit as important as the more commonly discussed student collaboration and recognises a best practice approach to use of technology in education to deliver the education experience.

75% of DSoD Schools in Ireland confirmed the programme had given rise to and created momentum in innovative and effective use of ICT tools by teachers.

84% of DSoD Schools in Ireland reported more focus on ICT usage to support curriculum objectives.

81% of DSoD Schools in Ireland focused more on leadership and vision in relation to integration of ICT in teaching as a result of the scheme.

Studies report learners recall just 10% of what they read and 20% of what they hear. If there are visuals accompanying an oral presentation, the number rises to 30%, and if they observe someone carrying out an action while explaining it, 50%. But learners remember 90% if they do the job themselves, even if only as a simulation. These facts support the rise in Gamification in Education and are the driver behind HP UK’s collaboration with Microsoft and the Tablet Academy rolling out our Minecraft in Education series of Roadshows and offering Schools and Colleges ‘bundles’ of the technology solutions (tablets or 2-in-1 devices), Minecraft EDU licenses and most importantly training for teachers to utilise the world’s second fastest selling computer game of all time to engage students and enable better learning. Almost 80% of learners in an independent study say that they would be more productive if their institution was more game-like and Minecraft EDU “encompasses the whole curriculum” and “finds a way to access student learning in a different way”.

For over 75 years we have been bringing innovation to Education and we are passionate to support academic institutions and their teachers. We have a new suite of solutions created ‘by students for students’ in our Education Edition range – built to withstand the rigors of the classroom environment, Page Wide printing technology offering an average double the speed of laser at half the cost and new product launches specifically for the Education sector which was announced at BETT 2016.

Kenneth Fyfe, HP UK Education Sales Manager, Kenneth.fyfe@hp.com, +44 (0) 7795 541 976, @HPEduKennie

Top 10 actions to troubleshoot performance of MRP

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 08:00
I wanted to write this blog post after a couple of Dynamics AX Performance Review where the Targeted scenario was execution of the MRP Batch . Every situation is different but there are similarities as well, especially when it comes to troubleshooting and patterns for improving performance. The objective of this article is to describe top 10 settings , based on experience from the field, that can help you improve the performance of MRP: 1. Fine tuning using iteration Because it is often...(read more)

Register for our HE webinar - Microsoft Certification and the Microsoft Imagine Academy

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 08:00
Higher education webinar - 11th February 2016, 15:30-16:15 Microsoft Certification and the Microsoft Imagine Academy

Last week we posted a blog exploring the value of Microsoft Certifications for students, not only when it comes to applying for jobs, but also in terms of how the technical skills they develop can improve the way they go about studying on a day to day basis.

Included in that post was a recording of a webinar from last April, run in conjunction with our partner Risual, exploring the value of certifications from the perspective of an employers, and also looking at West Hertfordshire College as an example of the benefits evident within education when students support their education with qualifications.

If you'd like to attend a live webinar, we will be running a session on Microsoft Certification and the Microsoft Imagine Academy within Higher Education, with our partner Prodigy Learning, on February 11th between 1530-1615.


To register, please email Anthony Nneke.

The session will cover a number of areas, including overviews of Microsoft Certifications such as Microsoft Office Specialist, Microsoft Technical Associate and Microsoft Certified Educator, and an introduction to the Microsoft Imagine Academy and apprenticeships programmes.

Throughout the webinar we will explore how all of these certifications and courses can contribute to increased productivity, employability, CPD, return on tech investment and alignment to the curriculum.

Also included in session will be a look at the MOS UK Championship, which forms part of the MOS World Championship, an annual global competition that tests students' skills on Microsoft Office applications, operated and sponsored in the UK by Prodigy Learning.

For further details about the webinar and to register, please email Anthony Nneke.

Register for our FE webinar - Microsoft Certification and the Microsoft Imagine Academy

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 07:45
Further education webinar - 11th February 2016, 15:30-16:15 Microsoft Certification and the Microsoft Imagine Academy

Last week we posted a blog exploring the value of Microsoft Certifications for students, not only when it comes to applying for jobs, but also in terms of how the technical skills they develop can improve the way they go about studying on a day to day basis.

Included in that post was a recording of a webinar from last April, run in conjunction with our partner Risual, exploring the value of certifications from the perspective of an employers, and also looking at West Hertfordshire College as an example of the benefits evident within education when students support their education with qualifications.

If you'd like to attend a live webinar, we will be running a session on Microsoft Certification and the Microsoft Imagine Academy within Further Education, with our partner Prodigy Learning, on February 11th between 1530-1615.


To register, please email Anthony Nneke.

The session will cover a number of areas, including overviews of Microsoft Certifications such as Microsoft Office Specialist, Microsoft Technical Associate and Microsoft Certified Educator, and an introduction to the Microsoft Imagine Academy and apprenticeships programmes.

Throughout the webinar we will explore how all of these certifications and courses can contribute to increased productivity, employability, CPD, return on tech investment and alignment to the curriculum.

Also included in session will be a look at the MOS UK Championship, which forms part of the MOS World Championship, an annual global competition that tests students' skills on Microsoft Office applications, operated and sponsored in the UK by Prodigy Learning.

For further details about the webinar and to register, please email Anthony Nneke.

Teachers, invite your students to OneNote Class Notebook and get them free Office 365

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 07:30

Microsoft are pleased to announce that teachers all teachers (even those who not have an Office 365 account) can now sign up for OneNote Class Notebooks for their class for free!

OneNote Class Notebook is an extension of OneNote which facilitates anytime anywhere learning for both students and teachers. With the OneNote Class Notebook you can organise class content and lesson plans, create interactive lessons by embedding digital and web content, set and grade assignments and facilitate instant collaboration. Not only can students work together in real time, but OneNote Class Notebook has the added capability of providing feedback to students as teachers can access their individual student's OneNote and provide personalised support by writing directly in their student's OneNote.

In addition to access to Office 365 at no cost, any teacher can now set up a OneNote Class Notebook and all they need is a school assigned email address - no IT support required!

To find out how to download get started for free with the OneNote Class Notebook, read this article.

What do you think of the new crisp and practical guidance?

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 07:23

We have made significant progress with our plans to innovate and modernise our guidance solutions.

Question 1: What do you think of the new solutions, style, tone and discoverability?

We are also looking for ways to simplify and reduce the number of images, illustrations and visualizations we use in the “crisper” guidance.

The current TFVC feature branching illustration:

The proposed new TFVC feature branching illustration:

An optional animation, whereby we are thinking of not looping continuously.

Question 2: What do you think of the new branching scenario diagram style and automation?

We need your feedback!

Do you have a question or feedback to our questions?

Add a comment below, !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs');or ping us here.

Internet of Things via Microcontrollers: Introduction

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 04:00

Looks like I have enough microcontrollers and boards in order to start (once again) my training about Internet of Things. I have decided to select a non-standard approach in the training, presenting more stuff about microcontrollers rather than about Arduino/Netduino/MyDuino boards, Let's see if you like that. I will try to publish at least one module per two weeks plus some bonus videos.

 

Join the Java Tools Challenge- Make Java Great with Visual Studio – Over $80,000 in prizes

MSDN Blogs - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 03:50

The 2016 Java Tools Challenge officially opened on Feb 1st and runs through Apr 30th.

Are you up for the challenge?

There are two ways you can participate: 

Create a Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) extension that helps developers create, test, and/or deploy Java apps; OR Create a Java app (multiple judging categories) using either the Visual Studio Team Services Eclipse plugin (aka Team Explorer Everywhere) or our JetBrains IntelliJ plugin.

  • Best Overall
    Best overall extension or app.
    $10,000 cash
    VSPP Premier Membership 1yr ($10,000 value)
    Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 Qty=3 ($18,000 value)
    Featured product listing on VS Marketplace
  • Best VSTS Extension
    Best VSTS extension for Java app developers.
    $1,500 cash
    Surface Pro 4 ($1,500 value)
    Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 ($6,000 value)
  • Best Android App
    Best Android app built using Java with VSTS and Eclipse or IntelliJ plugins for VSTS.
    $1,500 cash
    Surface Pro 4 ($1,500 value)
    Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 ($6,000 value)
  • Best Web App
    Best web app built using Java with VSTS, Eclipse or IntelliJ plugins for VSTS, and Azure app service.$1,500 cash
    Surface Pro 4 ($1,500 value)
    Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 ($6,000 value)
  • Best Azure SaaS App
    Best Azure SaaS app built using Java.
    $1,500 cash
    Surface Pro 4 ($1,500 value)
    Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 ($6,000 value)
  • Best Student App
    Best VSTS extension or Java app developed and submitted by a student.
    Oculus Rift ($750 value)
    Visual Studio Enterprise 2015 ($6,000 value)

What type of Java app or extension should you build?

There are no limits to what you can build for the Java Tools Challenge. Here are some ideas to get your started:

  • Integrations. Have a Java developer tool or extension that you want integrated with one of our Visual Studio and Team Services products? The Java Tools Challenge is your chance to build that integration.
  • Functionality. Wish Visual Studio Team Services tools would better support your Java development? The Java Tools Challenge is your chance to extend our products and help Java development teams work even smarter.
  • Existing App or Extension. Already have a private Java app built using the Visual Studio Team Services Eclipse plugin (aka Team Explorer Everywhere) or JetBrains IntelliJ plugin? Consider building a version to share for the Java Tools Challenge. Have a Visual Studio plugin or extension for Java development that you’ve built for your team? The Java Tools Challenge is a great way to share it with the Java developer community.
  • Solutions. Is there an industry or business team that would benefit from the customization of our products? Help these teams unleash their potential by building a Java app for the Java Tools Challenge..

Thousands of developers have developed apps and extensions for the Visual Studio platform. For some inspiration, checkout some of the products that have been published on our Visual Studio Marketplace.

To learn more about our Java development tools and integrations, check out our website at java.visualstudio.com, follow us on Twitter (@JavaALM) , and like our Facebook page.

Get Started and Sign up for the Challenge!

Are you up for the challenge?

There are two ways you can participate: 

Create a Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) extension that helps developers create, test, and/or deploy Java apps; OR Create a Java app (multiple judging categories) using either the Visual Studio Team Services Eclipse plugin (aka Team Explorer Everywhere) or our JetBrains IntelliJ plugin.

Eligibility

This challenge is open to:

  • Individuals (who have reached the age of majority in their jurisdiction of residence at the time of entry)
  • Teams of eligible individuals
  • Organizations (up to 50 employees)
  • Large Organizations (with over 50 employees) may compete only for the non-cash Large Organization Recognition Awards.
  • Employees of Large Organizations (with over 50 employees) are eligible as long as they enter the competition independent of their company and meet all other requirements.

Employees of Microsoft, Devpost, and contractors currently under contract work for Microsoft or Devpost are not eligible.

If you are employed by a public sector organization, please review the rules pertaining to prize fulfillment to a public sector organization employee.

How to enter
  1. “Register” to access the submission form, receive important communications, and form teams.
  2. Build an awesome VSTS extension for Java developers or a Java app using the VSTS plugin for Eclipse or IntelliJ.
  3. Visit the Resources pages for VSTS extensions, Visual Studio Team Services Eclipse plugin (aka Team Explorer Everywhere), and JetBrains IntelliJ plugin.
  4. Submit your VSTS extensions to the Visual Studio Marketplace.
  5. Shoot a demo video and/or take screenshots of your functioning app. 
  6. Create your submission on DevPost with a) Your extension/app name, b) VS Marketplace URL or link to your Java App in the "Website URL" field, and c) Banner image for your extension/app via the image uploader.
  7. Submit early! (You can edit your submission as many times as you want before the deadline.)
Competition Judges

Paul Barham
Principal Program Manager

David Staheli
Senior Software Engineer Mgr

Brian Harry
Corporate VP, Developer Division

Jamie Cool
Group Program Manager

Brian Benz
Sr. PM Cross-Platform and Open Tools

Martin Sawicki
Principal Software Engineer Mgr

Judging Criteria
  • Usefulness
    Is your app or extension solving a real problem developers have?
  • Innovation
    Is your app or extension creative and unique given the other apps and extensions in the market?
  • Quality
    Does the app or extension function as expected? Is it free of bugs?
  • Design
    Is the UI intuitive and the description informative including useful screenshots?

Register now http://javachallenge.devpost.com/

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