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Introducing Send Email in Access 2013 web apps

Mon, 01/12/2015 - 09:00

One of the top feature requests we’ve heard from customers using Access 2013 web apps hosted inside Office 365 is the need to be able to send emails from their apps. We listened and today we’re proud to announce that a new feature called “Send Email” is available to all of our customers using Office 365 with Access Services. Now you can send emails from your Access 2013 web apps to other members of your organization! Look for this feature in your web apps soon and try it out.

In order to see and use this new feature, you need to update Access: you must be using Access 2013 that has a minimum build number of 15.0.4649.1000. Once your Office 365 site has the new Send Email feature work turned on, and you’re using the minimum Access 2013 build, you’ll see the new SendEmail macro action in the Action Catalog when you’re designing data macros.

How does the Send Email feature work?

You can use the new SendEmail action when you’re working with data macros—both named data macros and data macros attached to table events (On Insert, On Update, and On Delete). When you’re working with named data macros, which you can run from control events on views displayed in your web browser, you can, for example, send an email about a specific record you’re viewing. In this scenario, you could create a command button or a custom Action Bar button on a view that uses the RunDataMacro action in the On Click event to run your saved named data macro that includes the new SendEmail action.

When you’re working with data macros attached to table events, you can send emails when new records are added, existing records are edited, or records are deleted. In this scenario, it makes it easy to alert relevant users within your organization when new records are created, modified, or deleted. To get started, you just double-click SendEmail in the Action Catalog to add it to the macro logic defined for that table event and fill in the required parameters.

Let’s take a closer look at how this works in an example of sending an email from a table event, in this case an On Insert event of an Orders table in an Access 2013 web app. As you can see in the following screenshot, the new SendEmail macro action is available within the Action Catalog.

Let’s discuss what the other data macro actions defined in this On Insert table event are doing before we discuss the new SendEmail action.

First, the existing defined macro actions look up the email address and first name of the employee for the new order entered into the app and assigns that information to local variables that are used later in the data macro.

Next, the data macro looks up the company name for the order and assigns that to a local variable as well.

The next three SetLocalVar actions build up various parts of the body of the email message, using HTML tags to add further customization to the message body. For example, if you want to include a line break in the message, you can use a <br> tag in the message.

The last action in the macro logic for this example is the new SendEmail macro action. To add the new action to the macro design window, just double-click SendEmail in the Action Catalog. The SendEmail macro action takes five arguments: To, Cc, Bcc, Subject, and Body.

Argument Required Description To Yes The recipients of the message whose names you want to put on the To line in the message. Separate the recipient names that you specify in this argument (and in the Cc and Bcc arguments) with a semicolon (;). Cc No The message recipients whose names you want to put on the Cc (carbon copy) line in the message. Bcc No The message recipients whose names you want to put on the Bcc (blind carbon copy) line in the message. Subject Yes The subject of the message. This text appears on the Subject line in the message. Body Yes The text that you want to include in the main body of the mail message.

For the To, Cc, and Bcc arguments, you can currently send emails only to people within your Office 365 organization. The email addresses used must be within the same company site or belong to guests of the site. For example, if your Office 365 company name is Contoso, the email addresses used with the SendEmail action must correspond to users of the Contoso site. Typically, they would be formatted as user@contoso.com.

Each of the arguments in the SendEmail action accepts the use of expressions. If you want to use an expression for one of the arguments, first type an equal sign (=), followed by the expression you want to use. When you type the equal sign, Access displays the Expression Builder button on the right side of the argument text box. You can click this button and use the Expression Builder dialog to help you build the expression, or combination of expressions, you want to use.

Using expressions, you can create custom emails that display relevant data from the app. In the following screenshot, you can see an example of the Expression Builder dialog displaying the expression we used for the Body argument of the SendEmail action for this table event. In this example, the Concat function is used in the Body argument of the SendEmail action to concatenate the three local variables previously defined in the SetLocalVar actions. The three local variables are combining HTML tags, custom message text, and record data within the app and the Body argument expression is combining all three of them together for the full email message. You can be very creative with the email messages you send from your apps using these expression techniques and your own imagination.

Here’s an example of what a completed email message looks like when you enter a new order into the app with the defined macro logic shown earlier.

That’s how using the new SendEmail data macro action on table events works. For sending emails from named data macros, you define the data macro logic the same way: just by double-clicking SendEmail from the Action Catalog and providing the needed parameters. And you also have opportunities to customize your messages in these scenarios as well.

Being able to send emails from your apps opens up more possibilities for using your custom Access 2013 web apps built on top of Office 365. We hope you enjoy this new Send Email feature within Access 2013 web apps hosted inside Office 365. Give it a try and let us know what you think!

—Jeff Conrad is a Senior Content Developer on the Office Creative Content Development team.

The post Introducing Send Email in Access 2013 web apps appeared first on Office Blogs.

Introducing a new feature in Access 2013 web apps—Download in Excel

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 09:00

It’s just the nature of shipping software in a services world with Office 365—when we hear your feedback, we can respond with new features that fill your needs. In the case of Access 2013 web apps, one of the most frequent feature requests we heard from customers was the need for an easier way to view their web app data in Excel. Currently, the process for viewing your Access web app data within Excel involves many steps.

We’re proud to announce that a new feature called, “Download in Excel” is available to all of our Access 2013 Office 365 customers, which makes this process much simpler. The changes are on the server side which means you do not need to update your Access client program at all. This update is available for customers using Office 365 with Access Services so look for this feature soon within your web apps and try it out.

How does the Download in Excel feature work?

When viewing any datasheet views in your browser for your Access web app on Office 365, you’ll see the new Download in Excel button on the right side of the Action Bar, as shown in the following screenshot:

When you click the Download in Excel button, you are prompted to either open or save the spreadsheet. If you choose to open the spreadsheet, Excel downloads a copy of the data from the datasheet view and then immediately displays it within the familiar Excel interface, as shown in the following example:

Once you have the data in Excel, you can utilize the rich set of Excel features to perform different tasks such as:

Currently, you can download up to 10,000 records from a datasheet into Excel. If you do not want to show this option for specific datasheet views, you can hide the Action Bar for that view, which will hide the Download in Excel button.

We hope you enjoy this new Download in Excel feature within Access web apps for SharePoint, which opens up more scenarios for your custom web apps built on top of Office 365. Give it a try and let us know what you think!

The post Introducing a new feature in Access 2013 web apps—Download in Excel appeared first on Office Blogs.

Help shape the Microsoft Ignite event

Thu, 11/20/2014 - 11:10

When we announced Microsoft Ignite last month, we told you it will bring together the best of our past events for Exchange, SharePoint, Lync and Project—and then take it to the next level, based on what our customers and partners have asked for.

Now we are asking for your feedback so we can deliver on that promise. What do you want to see at Microsoft Ignite? Help us provide you with better content by taking this quick online anonymous survey on the sessions you want to see; Call for Topics.

We’re holding a series of TweetJams on Twitter so we can hear more about what you want to see at the event. Join us at one of the times below.

Date Products Hashtag Add to calendar Monday, November 24th 9 a.m. PT @SharePoint @yammer #ignitejam ical link Tuesday, December 2nd 9 a.m. PT @MSFTExchange #ignitejam ical link Wednesday, December 3rd 3 p.m. PT @Office 365_tech #ignitejam ical link Tuesday, December 9th 9 a.m. PT @Project #ignitejam ical link

Here are general questions we’d like your feedback on during the TweetJam. Have other questions you think we should ask? Tweet them to @office365_tech.

  1. What’s one thing you’ve loved in a past event that you’d like to see included in Microsoft Ignite?
  2. How can we help showcase your community at Microsoft Ignite?
  3. What is your preferred way to engage with our engineering teams at the event?
  4. What specific sessions do you want to see?
  5. What have you seen done at ANY event you’ve attended, Microsoft or other, that we should consider doing at Microsoft Ignite?
  6. How interested are you in learning about other Microsoft products, such as Azure and Windows 10?
  7. What’s one “can’t miss” thing to do in Chicago?
  8. As you know from past events, we throw a great party for attendees. What do you value in a party? Great band? Cool venue? Loud or quiet? 

If you haven’t already, register now for Microsoft Ignite. Early bird discount expires on December 11th.

The post Help shape the Microsoft Ignite event appeared first on Office Blogs.

Introducing Microsoft Ignite

Thu, 10/16/2014 - 08:05

This morning on The Official Microsoft Blog, we revealed more details about our enterprise technology conference in May—Microsoft Ignite. If you attended the SharePoint Conference, Exchange Conference, Lync Conference or Project Conference, this is the conference for you. And, if you’re interested in or already using Office 365, this is the conference for you. Register now to reserve your spot and we will see you in Chicago on May 4, 2015.

Join the YamJam:

We are committed to making Microsoft Ignite an incredible and valuable event for all of us who are passionate about Office, Exchange, SharePoint, Lync, Project and Visio. We want your feedback to help shape plans for this event. Join us for a YamJam on the Office 365 Technical Network on Tuesday, October 21st 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. PDT to ask questions about the event and to provide feedback on what you want to see there. For those unfamiliar with a YamJam, it is similar to a “TweetJam” on Twitter or an “Ask Me Anything (AMA)” on Reddit, except it takes place on Yammer.

How to participate:

  1. Request access to the Office 365 Technical Network.
  2. Join the Ignite Event group. You can find it by using the Browse Groups function or through the search bar.
  3. Log in at 9:00 a.m. PDT on Tuesday, October 21st to ask questions and provide feedback on what you want to see from the Microsoft Office Division at the conference.

The post Introducing Microsoft Ignite appeared first on Office Blogs.

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