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Подписка для Windows Phone разработчиков на Xamarin бесплатно

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 06:52

Windows Phone разработчики могут получить подписку на один из самых популярных кросс-платформенных инструментов Xamarin совершенно бесплатно. Важно лишь иметь приложение, опубликованное в сторе.

Времени осталось совсем немного - предложение действительно до 31 августа.

Подать заявку можно здесь: http://aka.ms/xamarinforfree

Moving to VS 2015 from VS 2013

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 06:10

The folks on the Visual Studio team have been making it increasingly easier to move from version-to-version with less impact on our projects. In this post I’m going to examine the process of moving from Visual Studio 2013 to Visual Studio 2015.

In this series we’re working through the conversion of an MVC 5-based application and migrating it to MVC 6. You can track the entire series of posts from the intro page.

The Backstory

First, a bit about our application. I said this was a real-world application, and it is. You can clone the repo and run it locally if you like.

What we have is an expense report application, albeit a little on the light side for features. No worries, though, that is the intent! But the real pieces of an application sporting Onion Architecture are in place, and there’s quite a bit of commonly-used tech in this bad boy that you would likely find in any real-world app:

  • Separate projects for separate concerns
  • A UI Project that stands with only a single reference (to Core)
  • An older version of NHibernate
  • Unit tests
  • HTTP Handlers
  • The Bootstrap CSS/JS library
  • StructureMap for dependency injection
  • A database migrations library
  • A custom workflow engine

So, this is no File –> New –> Project here, this is the real deal.

First Steps

The first issue we’re going to address is the fact that our solution and project are currently in VS 2013 “mode”.  In the past, you’d likely have to walk through some kind of conversion process and this was usually a compelling enough reason for people to back delay an upgrade. Did you ever have issues with incorrect file paths, incompatible project type identifiers, broken project references and builds broken due to missing dependencies? At times, I’ve even had to resort to manually editing the solution and project files to get a project back online.  Thankfully, this is nothing like that. There is nothing major we need to do in order to get our project open in Visual Studio 2015, just load the solution from disk.

In the case of Bootcamp, our project opens cleanly and builds as we would expect. But you’ll notice right away a change in the repo.

Visual Studio 2015 runs IIS Express in a more specific context than previous versions, which is a huge win. The applicationhost.config is basically everything you need to get the web server up locally while you develop, debug and test, and it replaces what we would used to use for IIS Express for machine-wide configuration.

This file also happens to be in the .vs directory, used only for devs running Visual Studio on Windows. It’s also easily regenerated for other developers and we don’t need to check it into source control, lest we be endlessly trumping each others’ local changes. Instead of any project or solution modifications, we’re instead going to modify the .gitignore file, adding the following line:

**/src/.vs/

Great stuff! Easy, and we’re running in the latest version of everyone’s favorite IDE. We haven’t yet made any project structure changes, haven’t targeted any new .NET bits, but now we’re ready to start those pieces.

The pull request for this post can be reviewed here.

Pro tip: To get your solution to open in Visual Studio 2015 by default, instead of Visual Studio 2013, you can simply update the first few lines of your .sln file to include the following:
# Visual Studio 14
VisualStudioVersion = 14.0.23107.0

Next Steps

I’ve been running different incarnations of VS 2015 on my machine alongside Visual Studio 2013 (and for a period, VS 2010 as well) without any gotchas. There are some great new features that are worth checking out (it’s a long list), and your team may be able to leverage them.

While this is a short and single-focused post, I hope you see that opening the project in VS 2015 may yield no negative side effects. Heck, if you’re not sure you want to try it on your metal, you can even jump on a free trial of Azure and attempt to open your project on a VM running 2015.

Happy coding!

Why does a business student care about Azure?

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 06:00

Cloud isn’t just for geeks! Business students and entrepreneurs need to understand it’s potential impact as well. Find out how student entrepreneurs at Western University imagined Azure could help increase sales at a retail store.

Founders Network, the largest business technology club at Western University hosted a case competition. Their challenge:  to help a retail store increase sales. Microsoft Student Partner, Zain Hemani, did a short presentation on the cloud and Azure Machine Learning to help the students understand how the cloud can fit into a solution.

180 students were challenged to come up with a proposal to increase sales in a retail store given a fixed budget. We spoke with the top three teams to find out more about their winning ideas and to find out how they as business students saw a technology like Azure affecting their future.

Why does a business student care about Azure?

We asked the winning team of Kelly He and Laban Lin why business students need to learn about technologies such as Azure.

Kelly: In regards to the case, knowledge of Microsoft’s cloud platform was definitely crucial for success. Having a better understanding of Azure’s capabilities allowed us to utilize it in the most effective way to bring feasible solutions to the issues on hand. In a broader context, since business and technology are now so intertwined, understanding how to implement the benefits of new innovations will certainly help businesses profit. Although I am pursuing future studies in business, I definitely recognize the importance of learning about technology and how it can be used across various areas.

Lin: We also considered other ways in which Azure could be helpful – for example, storing the POS data on Azure’s infrastructure, analyzing Twitter events with Stream Analytics and even using Azure’s CDN services to speed up the retail website loading times. If you pour over the features that Azure offers, I think you’ll find an extraordinary number of ways it can help any company, and it’s definitely more than just the machine learning we applied.

How can Azure Machine Learning help retail marketing?

Here’s how the top teams envisioned Azure Machine learning as a part of their solutions.

First place: Kelly He and Laban Lin

Our solution relies on the analysis of sales using Azure machine learning to identify trends. Based on those trends create suitable ad campaigns and use Azure Machine Learning to analyze the success of those ads. Over time this allows the company to create ads tailored to consumers on each outlet (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc..). what makes our proposal unique is it recognizes the applications of cloud computing, particularly in data mining. Retail stores sit on a mountain of data, and analyzing past transactions gives us a powerful understanding of what customers want. It can’t reliably predict future trends, but in a highly automated system, we can update inventories reasonably quickly to adapt to consumer preferences. Now, the real breakthrough is in the scale of Azure – because we can buy as much processing power as we want, we can almost mine data in real time. That means we can launch ad campaigns based on what the data tells us customers want, and analyze critical factors daily or weekly to see how well those ads are being received. In this way, we leverage the existing capabilities offered to us as a SaaS and use that to propel a store into the modern age of data analytics.

Second place: Pallav Bhavsar, Veronica Pang, Jeet Chakrabarty, and Alexander Li

We came up with a marketing campaign that targets the Do it Yourself retail store shopper. The target demographic would hear about an idea on YouTube, then from the video to a Pinterest wall of ideas, and once they have selected a project are brought back to YouTube to find a retail store video. Click through rates would be tracked and Twitter would be used to submit new DIY project ideas.  Azure would be used to track parameters to measure campaign effectiveness including hashtags, mentions, follows, increase in views, and product click through rates.

Third place: Cathy Chen, Joanna Fu, Shirley Tan and Bobby Tzonev

We came up with the idea of creating a mobile app customers use within the store. The user can provide their gender and store area of interest. IBeacon devices (Bluetooth devices) in the store send signals to the phones as customers shop. The beacons track where customers go and can target shoppers with promotions. Machine learning on Azure could analyze the data collected to optimize inventory levels, and identify purchase patterns in the store.

Anyone can explore Azure for free

Whether you are inspired by the student suggestions above, or by the somewhat famous beer and diapers data mining story from 1992. You may want to explore cloud technology first hand to see what it can do for you:

MIE Minute - EduCast Series, Skype in the Classroom and more

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 05:30

Ahead of the new academic year starting in September, we're pleased to be back with more news and resources from the MIE Minute Newsletter.

As always, we have the three shareable items that our MIE Experts will be circulating throughout their networks, and in addition to this we are excited to share details of the upcoming EduCast series. But first, we have this edition's question…

Our MIE Experts have been asked to share their ideas for the new school year via the #educhange hashtag, and we'd like to open this up to the wider education community. So please take to your social media accounts and tell the world what you plan to change within your teaching environment or activities this year.

 

Shareable items:

 

Make School Life Easier with Skype in the Classroom

Skype in the Classroom enables you to bring the entire world into your lessons through calls to experts, classes in other countries and more. But even when you’re not in the classroom, Skype has a lot of features to make school life easier. So, with a new school year coming up fast, let’s look at some ways to put Skype to work for you at school.

OneNote User Feedback

Have ideas on how to improve OneNote for use in schools? Let us know here, and upvote other ideas you find promising!

 

Microsoft Hackathon 2015 Winner Extends OneNote to Improve Learning Outcomes for Students

Education is a must-have ingredient for success. And to succeed in education, reading and writing is essential. The challenges that come with language barriers and learning disabilities such as dyslexia are vast and varied, but luckily technology is able to help many students overcome literacy obstacles.

One solution is coming from a team at Microsoft that spans collaboration between Windows, OneNote, Bing and Microsoft Research: the OneNote for Learning extension. Learn more about the project and how it may be coming soon to your school!

---

Finally we're thrilled to share details of the upcoming Microsoft EduCast series. Attend the Sept. 8 EduCast - What's New from Microsoft in Education - to kick off the new school year with fresh ideas and new insight on how to use sparkling new technology like Windows 10, Microsoft Edge, and more!

Click here for full listings of future sessions and to register for a Microsoft EduCast.

MIE Minute - EduCast Series, Skype in the Classroom and more

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 05:30

Ahead of the new academic year starting in September, we're pleased to be back with more news and resources from the MIE Minute Newsletter.

As always, we have the three shareable items that our MIE Experts will be circulating throughout their networks, and in addition to this we are excited to share details of the upcoming EduCast series. But first, we have this edition's question…

Our MIE Experts have been asked to share their ideas for the new school year via the #educhange hashtag, and we'd like to open this up to the wider education community. So please take to your social media accounts and tell the world what you plan to change within your teaching environment or activities this year.

 

Shareable items:

 

Make School Life Easier with Skype in the Classroom

Skype in the Classroom enables you to bring the entire world into your lessons through calls to experts, classes in other countries and more. But even when you’re not in the classroom, Skype has a lot of features to make school life easier. So, with a new school year coming up fast, let’s look at some ways to put Skype to work for you at school.

OneNote User Feedback

Have ideas on how to improve OneNote for use in schools? Let us know here, and upvote other ideas you find promising!

 

Microsoft Hackathon 2015 Winner Extends OneNote to Improve Learning Outcomes for Students

Education is a must-have ingredient for success. And to succeed in education, reading and writing is essential. The challenges that come with language barriers and learning disabilities such as dyslexia are vast and varied, but luckily technology is able to help many students overcome literacy obstacles.

One solution is coming from a team at Microsoft that spans collaboration between Windows, OneNote, Bing and Microsoft Research: the OneNote for Learning extension. Learn more about the project and how it may be coming soon to your school!

---

Finally we're thrilled to share details of the upcoming Microsoft EduCast series. Attend the Sept. 8 EduCast - What's New from Microsoft in Education - to kick off the new school year with fresh ideas and new insight on how to use sparkling new technology like Windows 10, Microsoft Edge, and more!

Click here for full listings of future sessions and to register for a Microsoft EduCast.

How to spot the “Next Big Thing”

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 03:48

What will the next big technological breakthrough be?

Technology conferences love to talk about The Next Big Thing. Come and see! Line up for the big unveiling! Watch as we unveil the new tool that will define the next decade! Then, after all the thunder and fanfare, there’s a brief tech demo – and then what? It’s usually a bit of a letdown. The new gizmo is interesting, but you’re not sure how it’s meant to change your life. You certainly can’t picture yourself using one.

You’re not alone. The history of technology launches is full of moments like this one. The good news is, just because a tool seems frivolous today doesn’t mean it won’t change the world tomorrow. In fact, there’s evidence to suggest that the real Next Big Thing, the tool that really does change your life, has already been invented. It’s probably years old by this point. You just don’t know how to use it yet.

Alexander Graham Bell had no idea what he was unleashing when he placed the world’s first telephone call. Bell knew he’d invented a way to transmit speech using electricity, but he thought of the telephone as an evolution of the telegraph. He envisioned a world where every town had one telephone, which people would use to send a message to another town’s telephone office. That’s nice, but it’s hardly a revolution. It would take another inventor, Tivadar Puskás, to see the potential of telephone networks and invent the exchanges and switchboards needed to make personal telephones a reality.

When Guglielmo Marconi invented the first commercial wireless telegraphy system, he didn’t know his discovery would someday allow BBC Radio One DJs to play the-hits-that-just-won’t-quit for commuters heading home from work. He thought radio waves would be used for person-to-person communication, especially across long distances where telephone or telegraph wiring would be impractical. It would be decades before radio enthusiasts like Frank Conrad came up with the idea of playing music or reading the news over the airwaves, inventing broadcasting as we know it today.

What’s going on here? Bell and Marconi were geniuses. How could someone be smart enough to invent something as revolutionary as the telephone or the radio and still not be able to see how those invention would be used? Simple: Invention is a moment; application is a process.

Bell and Marconi were focused on solving particular problems and so they saw their inventions as keys made for locks. When people like Puskás and Conrad began playing around with these new inventions, they didn’t approach them with the same lock-and-key mentality, freeing them to head in unexpected directions. Innovation is as much about context and perspective and is it about intelligence.

Author Steven Johnson talks about technology opening up the “adjacent possible.” When someone comes up with a new idea, lots of other related ideas are an inevitable consequence. Picture climbing a mountain and seeing a new horizon laid out before you for the first time. That unexplored country, which you couldn’t see before the climb, is the “adjacent possible.” People like Bell and Marconi climb mountains and their discoveries send explorers like Puskás and Conrad out into the valley below.

This cycle is still happening today. Mobile text messages were originally meant to be used only by wireless carriers to talk to customers. Twitter was envisioned as broadcast platform until a user invented the hashtag and turned it into the world’s most powerful discussion engine. In medicine, aerospace, defence and every other field of human endeavor, innovative minds are forever finding new applications for old ideas.

The same cycle plays out at Microsoft too. Kinect was originally conceived as a tool for enhancing video games. Now we’re envisioning a world where the same hands-free technology is used to enhance the world of surgeons, retailers, educators and more. Some of the coolest work being done with Microsoft technology isn’t even being done at Microsoft. It’s being done by our partners -- small, locally owned businesses who continue to find new, innovative applications for Microsoft solutions right here in the UK.

Technology conference love talking about the Next Big Thing. But if the Next Big Thing is already here, then surely the application is what really matters. That’s how the Next Big Thing becomes the Now Big Thing. That’s how the distant future becomes the cutting edge. Why isn’t there a show for technology like that?  

Turns out there is. We’re calling it Future Decoded. On 10-11 November, you can join us in London and discover game-changing applications of existing technologies. You’ll meet partners who can walk you through the “adjacent possible” of 2015. You’ll meet partners who can show you how today’s tools will create tomorrow’s opportunities. You’ll meet businesses and organisations of every size and type who are using little-understood tools today to lay the foundation for big things tomorrow. Best of all, you’ll learn how you can join them. And the whole thing is free. See you there

První preview Windows kontejnerů

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 01:36
Minulý týden na svém blogu oznámil Scott Guthrie první preview Windows kontejnerů v Microsoft Azure, které budou součástí Windows Serveru 2016 (v současnosti Technical Preview ). Zároveň přišlo další ovoce úzké spolupráce s Dockerem – podpora platformy Windows v Dockeru . Nyní již tedy můžete nasazovat aplikace do kontejnerů nejen na Linuxu, ale také na Windows Server...(read more)

Windows 10 Training Videos – Universal Apps

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 01:30

Consistency of experience is crucial within education. Ensuring that everyone within a class – including the teacher – is getting the same experience when using apps and software is vital to the smooth running of lessons, allowing everyone to progress with projects and work collaboratively.

Over the last couple of weeks we've been exploring some of the ways in which Windows 10 can be used by teachers and students as part of their class time and periods of personal or group study, through a series of videos presented by some members of our global network of expert educators.

In this tutorial video we discover the new, unified look and feel of Windows 10 apps with Maps, Photos, OneNote, and apps from the Windows Store. Having a consistent experience means teachers can focus less on teaching students how to use the technology, and more on creating highly engaging lessons.

We're back in the hands of Justin Talmadge, MIEE from the USA, as demonstrates how universal apps work within Windows 10:

If you’d like to take a further look at Windows 10, there are several other tutorial videos on the Microsoft in Education YouTube channel that you can watch.

You can also find more information about Windows 10 in Education on the Microsoft in Education blog.

Windows 10 Training Videos – Universal Apps

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 01:30

Consistency of experience is crucial within education. Ensuring that everyone within a class – including the teacher – is getting the same experience when using apps and software is vital to the smooth running of lessons, allowing everyone to progress with projects and work collaboratively.

Over the last couple of weeks we've been exploring some of the ways in which Windows 10 can be used by teachers and students as part of their class time and periods of personal or group study, through a series of videos presented by some members of our global network of expert educators.

In this tutorial video we discover the new, unified look and feel of Windows 10 apps with Maps, Photos, OneNote, and apps from the Windows Store. Having a consistent experience means teachers can focus less on teaching students how to use the technology, and more on creating highly engaging lessons.

We're back in the hands of Justin Talmadge, MIEE from the USA, as demonstrates how universal apps work within Windows 10:

If you’d like to take a further look at Windows 10, there are several other tutorial videos on the Microsoft in Education YouTube channel that you can watch.

You can also find more information about Windows 10 in Education on the Microsoft in Education blog.

Windows 10 Training Videos – Universal Apps

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 01:30

Consistency of experience is crucial within education. Ensuring that everyone within a class – including the teacher – is getting the same experience when using apps and software is vital to the smooth running of lessons, allowing everyone to progress with projects and work collaboratively.

Over the last couple of weeks we've been exploring some of the ways in which Windows 10 can be used by teachers and students as part of their class time and periods of personal or group study, through a series of videos presented by some members of our global network of expert educators.

In this tutorial video we discover the new, unified look and feel of Windows 10 apps with Maps, Photos, OneNote, and apps from the Windows Store. Having a consistent experience means teachers can focus less on teaching students how to use the technology, and more on creating highly engaging lessons.

We're back in the hands of Justin Talmadge, MIEE from the USA, as demonstrates how universal apps work within Windows 10:

If you’d like to take a further look at Windows 10, there are several other tutorial videos on the Microsoft in Education YouTube channel that you can watch.

You can also find more information about Windows 10 in Education on the Microsoft in Education blog.

Nye muligheder for differentiering af it med Windows og Office

MSDN Blogs - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 00:45

Med Windows 10 kommer også et helt nyt Office, der er optimeret til touch og mobilitet. Basisversionerne af Office vil – som hidtil – kunne tilgås gratis, hvorimod de komplekse funktioner kræver et Office 365-abonnement. Der åbnes dermed for differentieret brug af Office i grundskolen, hvor de yngste elever kan stifte bekendtskab med Office i basisversionerne, der rummer kernefunktionaliteten i Office.

I løbet af de seneste år har vi genopfundet Office, så den er tilpasset en verden, hvor mobilitet, skyen og BYOD (bring your own device) er afgørende tendenser, vores kunder forholder sig til. Til Windows 10-lanceringen fremviste vi et vigtigt element i det nye styresystem, nemlig en helt ny Office-oplevelse, hvor Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Sway og OneNote kommer i nye versioner, der er skræddersyet til brug med touch og integration på tværs af enheder. I dette indlæg ser vi nærmere på de nye Office-apps til Windows 10 og muligheden for at differentiere elevernes møde med Office og understøttelsen af BYOD.

Office-apps giver samme oplevelse på alle elevernes enheder

Office til Windows 10 er optimeret til berøringsfølsomme skærme – lige fra små smartphones og tablets til bærbare pc’er. De enkelte apps (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Sway og OneNote) er designet fra bunden i Windows 10 og er universelle, hvilket betyder at samme app fungerer ens og har samme visning på en pc, tablet eller smartphone. Samtidigt minder Office-apps til Windows visuelt og funktionsmæssigt om de tilsvarende apps på Android og iOS, hvilket sikrer en smidigere overgang til BYOD for både elever og lærere.

Office-apps til Windows 10 vil være gratis i basisformat og være optimeret til den enkelte enhed. Disse apps vil indeholde basisfunktioner, som er velegnet til simpel redigering, der vil fungere som en udmærket introduktion til Office for de mindste elever, der skal stifte bekendtskab med tekstbehandling, præsentationer og lave tabeller. Herefter vil det være naturligt at løbende introducere eleverne til den fulde Office-pakke og mulighederne i Office 365, desto ældre og dygtigere de bliver.

Vi forventer, at langt de fleste kunder stadig vil efterspørge de avancerede funktioner i Office til optimering af dokument- og datahåndtering samt styrke kommunikation og samarbejde for både administrationen, lærere og elever. Den fulde Office-oplevelse vil som hidtil være tilgængelig til pc og Mac via et Office 365 abonnement. Dette gælder også ubegrænset lagring i OneDrive samt den nyeste version af Office (Office 2016 til Mac og snart Office 2016 til Windows.)

De nye Office apps vil være præinstalleret på Windows 10 telefoner og mindre tablets og kan downloades fra Windows Store til pc’er og andre større enheder. De samme apps kan downloades via de respektive app-stores i både iOS og Android.

Læs mere om Office på Windows 10 her.

Become the August 2015 Small Basic Guru!!! Here's how!

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 23:26

Just add your TechNet Wiki article to this list:

   

One winner in each category will be selected each month for glory and adoration by the MSDN/TechNet Ninjas and community as a whole. This includes a dedicated blog post in the Wiki Ninjas blog, a tweet from the Wiki Ninjas Twitter account, an announcement on your forum, and other acknowledgement from the community. 

Winners will be voted on by the judges. The judges consist of Microsoft MVPs, TechNet Wiki Community Council members, and Microsoft Employee SMEs (Subject Matter Experts -usually the people making the technologies). The judges will be looking for articles that are thorough, technically accurate, visually clear (images might help, but aren't necessary), and well written.

   

How to Enter

1) Create a new TechNet article YOU CAN COPY YOUR CONTRIBUTION FROM MSDN/TECHNET FORUMS OVER TO TECHNET WIKI (IN AUGUST) TO QUALIFY FOR THESE AWARDS. You can also create a new article not related to your forums contributions. 

A) Log into TechNet/MSDN with your Microsoft credentials

B) Add your content as an article to TechNet Wiki: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/add.aspx%20  

If you are copying and pasting your MSDN/TechNet forum solutions over to TechNet Wiki, please give some introduction to the problem, make sure your steps are clear, and then link to the original forum post. You can also paste in your blog posts (rather than forum content).

2) Tell us about it To add a link to your article:

A) Log into TechNet with your Microsoft credentials

B) Click the "Edit" tab on the list of August Guru articles, and copy in the URL  to your TechNet Wiki article into the appropriate section, along with your name and link to your profile!

  

 

We're looking forward to seeing your article!

Small and Basically yours,

    - Ninja Ed

Don't miss the Windows 10 partner opportunities at APC

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 23:11

We're looking forward to seeing many of our partners at APC next week, and talking about the new opportunities for you with Windows 10. We have great content planned, and lots of opportunities for you to connect with the local team:

1. Attend the # 1 keynote: Delivering more personal computing. Wednesday 9am

2. Register for the Making money with Windows 10 bookable session Thursday 10:00 - 12:00

Discover the new opportunities and how you can make money with Windows 10. Hear the findings of local customer and partner research and have the chance for Q&A with the team. Book now through the APC portal

3. Don't miss the Customer Trends Session: Keeping up with Modern Workplace – Partnering for profitability beyond Productivity. Tuesday 1pm

Come and learn about how changes in the workplace and how Microsoft is reimagining productivity and mobility are creating opportunities for you to be more profitable.

4. Visit us at The Hub: Check out Windows 10 in action and join one of the Q&A sessions with the Windows team:

  • Monday afternoon before the Welcome keynote
  • Tuesday @ the afternoon tea break
  • Wednesday @ the morning tea break

Installation de SharePoint Server 2016 Preview

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 23:09
Introduction

 

Et voilà, le très attendu SharePoint Server 2016 est bientôt parmi nous. En attendant la version finale prévue pour le printemps 2016, depuis le 24 Août Microsoft a mis à disposition la version Preview. Cette version est une version "beta" publique qui peut être essayée gratuitement pendant 180 jours.

Voici une procédure en français pour vous aider à installer et essayer cette version avec des captures d'écran à chaque étape. Avertissement : ceci est une installation "stand alone", c'est-à-dire que tous les rôles SharePoint sont installés sur une seule et même machine (aka Single Server Farm). Ce n'est évidemment pas une bonne pratique pour une ferme de production, mais ceci fait l'affaire pour une machine de développement ou d'intégration. Pour finir, si vous souhaitez avoir un peu plus d'information sur cette nouvelle version de SharePoint, ainsi que connaître les limitations et le rôle de la version Preview, je vous conseille les deux articles suivant (en anglais) : https://blogs.office.com/2015/08/24/announcing-availability-of-sharepoint-server-2016-it-preview-and-cloud-hybrid-search/ (annonce officielle) et http://www.learningsharepoint.com/2015/08/24/things-you-need-to-know-before-you-install-sharepoint-2016-preview/

 

Téléchargement des binaires et prérequis

 

Avant de se lancer dans l'installation, il nous faut impérativement deux choses: télécharger les binaires d'installation et préparer la machine virtuelle.

Pour télécharger les binaires d'installation, rendez-vous à l'adresse suivante : https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=48712

N'y chercher pas la version française ou un language pack français, la version Preview de SharePoint 2016 n'est disponible à ce stade qu'en anglais ou avec les languages packs Japonais et Espagnol. Noter également dans ce lien en dessous la clé produit, elle vous sera nécessaire pendant l'installation.

Deuxième étape, la préparation de la machine virtuelle qui hébergera notre serveur. Au niveau des performances de la machine, n'hésitez pas à être généreux. Si vous utilisez Microsoft Azure (vivement recommandé), je vous conseille par exemple d'opter pour une machine de type A6 ou plus. En gros, optez pour une machine du type :

16 Go RAM minimum (prévoir même plutôt 24 Go), 64-bit, Processeurs 4 cores à + de 2Ghz, 80 Go pour le disque système, un disque secondaire de 100 Go ou plus. 

Au niveau de la version du système d'exploitation et de la base de données, je vous conseille : L'édition 64-bit de Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard ou Datacenter et au niveau de SQL Server vous pouvez opter pour l'édition 64-bit de Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Service Pack 1 (SP1) ou l'édition 64-bit de Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard ou Datacenter.

N'oubliez pas également de créer un contrôleur de domaine Active Directory et de créer les comptes adéquat à une installation de SharePoint (vous pouvez vous référer au guide de 2013 pour cela, les choses n'ont guère évoluées à ce niveau : https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc678863.aspx). Activer sur ce serveur les rôles Web Server (IIS) et Application Server (framework .net etc.).

Comme vous allez le voir, d'autres prérequis sont nécessaires pour installer SharePoint Server. Toutefois, l'outil d'installation est capable de les télécharger et les installer pour vous. Cela suppose toutefois que votre serveur puisse se connecter à Internet. Si ce n'est pas le cas, voici la liste complète des prérequis nécessaires à l'installation :

  • Web Server (IIS) role
  • Application Server role
  • Microsoft .NET Framework version 4.5.2
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Native Client
  • Microsoft WCF Data Services 5.6
  • Microsoft Information Protection and Control Client (MSIPC)
  • Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 SP1 (x64)
  • Windows Management Framework 3.0 which includes Windows PowerShell 3.0
  • Microsoft Identity Extensions
  • Windows Server AppFabric 1.1
  • Cumulative Update Package 1 for Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server (KB 2671763)
  • Microsoft ODBC Driver 11 for SQL Server
  • Update for Microsoft .NET Framework to disable RC4 in Transport Layer Security (KB2898850)
  • Visual C++ Redistributable Package for Visual Studio 2013 

Dernier conseil et pas des moindre, installer tous ces logiciels en version anglaise EN-US !! Cela vous évitera probablement bien des ennuis sur des scénarios non encore testés par le groupe produit !! 

 

Installation des binaires

 

Ca y'est vous êtes prêt à lancer l'installation ? C'est partit !

Faites cette installation avec un compte d'installation qiu possède les droits administrateurs de la machine.

Tout d'abord, faite un clic droit sur l'image ISO et cliquer sur Mount :

 Cela vous ajoutera un lecteur qui porte le numéro de release de la version Preview (16.0.4316.1217). Ouvrez ce lecteur :

 Lancer l'exécutable prerequisiteinstaller.exe qui est l'outil pour installer les prérequis : 

Cliquer sur Next :

L'outil va configurer les rôles nécessaires sur le serveur :

Cliquer sur Finish, le système va redémarrer :

Après le redémarrage, l'outil de prérequis va reprendre l'installation. Si ce n'est pas le cas, remonter l'image iso et relancer l'outil d'installation des prérequis, cela va reprendre aux installations suivantes. Cocher "I accept.." et cliquer sur Next :

Tous les prérequis vont être installés. Une fois terminé cliquer sur Finish, puis le système va encore une fois redémarrer :

Une fois redémarré, lancer l'exécutable nommé setup.exe pour lancer l'installation :

Patientez durant la vérification des prérequis. Ne vous inquiétez pas si la fenêtre semble "frisée" et attendre que celle-ci vous redonne la main : 

Si les prérequis sont bien installés, vous allez être inviter à saisir la clé du produit. Pour la version Preview, la clé est disponible juste en dessous du lien pour télécharger l'image ISO sur la page de Microsoft.com (voir adresse dans l'introduction). Cliquer ensuite sur Continue :

Cochez "I accept..", puis cliquer sur Continue :

Choisir les répertoire d'installation ou laisser par défaut, puis cliquer sur "Install Now" :

Patientez durant l'installation :

L'installation est terminée et vous allez être invité à lancer le "Configuration Wizard" qui va vous permettre de créer et configurer votre ferme SharePoint 2016 :

 

Configuration de la ferme (aka Config Wizard)

 

Si vous avez laissé cocher "Run the..", l'écran suivant va se lancer automatiquement. Si ce n'est pas le cas, ce n'est pas un soucis, vous retrouverez ce programme dans votre liste d'applications sous le titre "SharePoint Products Configuration Wizard". Cliquez sur Next : 

Le programme a besoin de redémarrer IIS, cliquer sur Yes :

Nous allons créer un nouvelle ferme, donc cocher "Create a new server farm" et cliquer sur Next :

Saisir le nom de votre instance SQL, ainsi que le compte et le mot de passe du compte d'accès (exemple: le compte administrateur de ferme). Cliquer sur Next : 

Saisir une "passphrase" (mot de passe par exemple). Celui-ci est important, conserver le de côté. Il vous sera nécessaire si vous décider de rajouter un nouveau serveur dans votre ferme plus tard. Cliquer sur Next :

C'est la grande nouveauté de la version 2016 : la capacité d'installer configurer votre serveur à partir de modèles topologiques. On peut choisir par exemple un serveur web frontal, un serveur pure applicatif, etc. etc. Pour une ferme mono-machine "all-in-one", cocher "Single Farm Server" et cliquer sur Next :

Choisir le port de votre centrale d'administration (site de gestion de la ferme) et choisir le mode d'authentification (par défaut choisir NTLM). Cliquer sur Next :

SharePoint vous récapitule les informations, si elles sont correctes, cliquer sur Next : 

 

Patientez durant la configuration (l'étape 3 - création et configuration des bases de données va prendre un peu de temps ne pas s'en inquiéter) :

Si tout s'est bien passé, l'écran suivant va apparaître, cliquer sur Finish :

 

Configuration additionnelle dans la centrale d'administration

 

Félicitations, le plus gros de l'installation est derrière nous. Maintenant nous allons finir les étages de configuration qui se font via la centrale d'administration. Cette fenêtre va normalement s'ouvrir toute seule. Si ce n'est pas le cas pas de panique, vous pouvez retrouver un lien dans votre menu d'application (ex menu démarrer) ou y accéder par votre navigateur via le port choisit précédemment.

Au 1ier lancement, SharePoint va vous proposer de reporter vos erreurs aux équipes produit pour permettre d'améliorer la version 2016 d'ici sa sortie. Cocher "Yes.." et cliquer sur OK :

Vous aller maintenant être invité à configurer les services techniques de SharePoint. Deux choix sont possibles : utiliser l'assistant (Wizard) ou le faire manuellement. Les puristes et les installations de production préférerons évidemment une installation à la main. Pour un environnement de test, le wizard fait très bien l'affaire. Cliquer sur le bouton "Start the Wizard" :

L'assistant va vous inviter à choisir les comptes et services à utiliser dans votre ferme. Saisir le compte et le mot de passe du compte de service à utiliser puis cocher les services que vous souhaitez utiliser :

Cochez les services que vous souhaitez utiliser. Noter que j'ai ici cocher le service "Microsoft SharePoint Insights", car celui-ci est une nouveauté de SharePoint 2016 et que je suis intéressé par le tester ;-) Cliquer sur Next :

La configuration des services va commencer, ne pas s'étonner si cette étape prend du temps, il y'a pas mal de boulot sous-jacent. Prenez votre mal en patience ;-)

Félicitations ! Votre configuration est terminée ! SharePoint est maintenant prêt à être utilisé ! Vous pouvez noter l'apparition de "l'App Launcher" en haut à gauche du ruban noir supérieur.

 

Création d'un site d'équipe

 

L'installation à proprement parlé est terminée. Toutefois pour tester un site SharePoint, il nous reste à créer un site d'équipe.

Pour cela, cliquer sur "Manage Web applications":

 Normalement une web application nommée "SharePoint - 80" a été créé et est disponible sur le port 80. Vérifiez que c'est bien le cas et revenez en arrière :

Cliquez sur "Create site collections" : 

Saisir le nom de votre site (par exemple ici "Team Site") :

Choisir un modèle de site (par exemple le "team site"), puis saisir le compte du propriétaire du site :

Cliquer sur OK :

Le processus de création du site est en cours :

La création est terminée, cliquer sur l'adresse de votre site :

Un nouvel onglet apparaît et vous donne accès à votre site d'équipe :

 

Conclusion

 

Bravo, vous avez terminé ! Votre ferme SharePoint Server 2016 Preview est maintenant opérationnelle et vous allez pouvoir vous amuser avec d'ici la sortie de la version finale.

Comme vous avez pu le constater si vous connaissez la version 2013 de SharePoint Server, l'installation n'est pas très différente et vous retrouverez facilement vos marques. A noter tout de même l'installation de serveurs avec des rôles spécifiques, qui aide grandement la construction de ferme SharePoint multiserveurs.

Cette nouvelle fonctionnalité est appelée "Min Roles", et est une nouveauté importante pour les IT Pro. Nous aurons l'occasion d'en reparler dans de futurs articles.

Enjoy SharePoint Server 2016 Preview !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office 365 API の Commercial & Consumer の Unified 開発 (Outlook.com 対応の REST API)

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 22:08

Outlook.com (旧 Hotmail) でも REST API 呼び出しが可能になった Unified Outlook Services API を例に、商用向けと一般向けの双方の Office 365 に対応した新しい API のプログラミング モデルを紹介します。

...(read more)

Spotlight on ALM and TFS

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 20:00

Establishing good ALM practices and learning to take full advantage of ALM tools is one of the best investments you can make with your team. Premier Support for Developers works with many of Microsoft’s largest and most strategic customers to optimize the use of Team Foundation Server and Visual Studio ALM tools. Whether you are planning a move to the cloud with VSO, exploring the new 2015 toolset, or optimizing the version of TFS you have deployed against your custom business requirements, we can help.

Premier Support for Developers provides access to a broad range of ALM experts and TFS resources. Below are just a few of the popular ALM workshops available to our customers in the US and Canada.  Check with your ADM to find out more about the ALM workshops available in your region. TFS Essentials

The Visual Studio 2013 ALM TFS Essentials Workshop is a three-day instructor-led training course that provides participants with must have fundamentals when using Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server 2013. Best practices for working with Team Foundation Version Control (TFVC), Work Items, and Team Foundation Build will be covered in-depth. Proficiency with these three “pillars” is key to unlocking the full potential of your software development efforts and becoming skillful with ALM practices. Demystify the tooling and features to enable developers of all skill levels to ‘unlock’ huge productivity gains by enhancing their skills on Visual Studio Team Foundation Server.

Topics Include

  • Visual Studio ALM Overview
  • Team Projects
  • Team Foundation Version Control Fundamentals
  • Team Foundation Version Control Advanced Topics
  • Getting Started with Git
  • Work Items
  • Team Foundation Build
  • Release Management
  • Plan and Track Projects
Testing Tools

The Visual Studio 2013 ALM Testing Tools Workshop is a three-day instructor-led training course that provides participants with a wide range of technical information about Visual Studio 2013 Testing Tools. Specifically, it discusses how the Visual Studio integrated tool suite and Microsoft Test Manager (MTM) can help testers and developers create and manage robust test plans and suites throughout the Software Development Life Cycle. After completion, participants will have a deeper understanding of how to leverage Visual Studio testing tools to thoroughly test their applications and services. This Workshop is meant to cover a variety of test types and tools available with Visual Studio 2013. An in-depth coverage for MTM and manual testing as well as automated testing using Visual Studio is included.

Topics Include

  • Visual Studio ALM Overview
  • Managing Testing Efforts
  • Manual Testing
  • Unit Testing
  • Coded UI Testing
  • Web Performance and Load Testing
  • Introduction to Visual Studio Lab Management
TFS Administration

The Visual Studio 2013 ALM Team Foundation Server Administration Workshop is a three day instructor-led training course that provides participants with a wide range of technical information about administering Team Foundation Server. It specifically discusses how Team Foundation Server provides a fundamental point of integration for the entire suite of development tools and technologies. After completing the Workshop, participants will have a deeper understanding of how to implement, manage, administer, and maintain an enterprise level Team Foundation Server deployment.

Topics Include

  • Visual Studio ALM Overview
  • Architecture and Internals
  • Security
  • Version Control
  • Team Foundation Build and Release Management
  • Customizing Team Foundation Server
  • Disaster Recovery
  • Installations and Upgrades
  • Performance Monitoring and Tuning
Lab Management

The Visual Studio 2013 ALM: Lab Management Workshop is a three-day instructor-led training course that provides participants with must have fundamentals when using Lab Management, an extension of Microsoft Test Manager. In depth coverage is provided on best practices for working with Lab Management and the related technologies such as Hyper-V and System Center Virtual Machine Manager. Students will learn how to setup and administer Lab Management as well as create and manage virtual environments.

Topics Include

  • Visual Studio ALM Overview
  • Lab Management Configuration
  • Test Environments
  • Testing: This module will explore
  • Build Automation
  • Developer and Tester workflows
Release Management

The DevOps: Release Management for Visual Studio Workshop is a three-day instructor-led training course that provides participants with essential knowledge of concepts for Release Management for Visual Studio. Releasing software frequently and dependably enables you to gather early feedback and respond to change quickly. Continuous delivery is quickly becoming the standard by which software projects are executed. Projects of all sizes face challenges releasing software that threaten the bottom line. This workshop will equip users of Visual Studio ALM with the necessary skills to build an effective release pipeline with the Release Management functionality provided by Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server. The tooling in Visual Studio ALM provides organizations the ability to bring IT and Development group’s together working on a centralized approach for releasing software in a predictable dependable way. Mature the DevOps story inside of your organization by leveraging Release Management, and drive predictable efficient releases for your organization.

Topics Include

  • Visual Studio ALM Overview
  • Release Management Architecture
  • Release Pipelines
  • Release Management and Team Foundation Build
  • Deployment Recipes
  • Advanced Topics (custom tools, etc.)

Premier Support for Developers provides strategic technology guidance, critical support coverage, and a range of essential services to help teams optimize development lifecycles and improve software quality.  Contact your Application Development Manager (ADM) or email us to learn more about what we can do for you.

ログインを必要としないログ収集ツールについて(AzureLogCollector)

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 19:36
クラウド サービスを対象としたトラブルシューティングでは、インスタンス内部に保存されているログから調査を進める方法が有効です。Azure チームからは AzureTools や SDP ツールなど、当該インスタンスへリモート デスクトップでログインし取得する方法をご紹介しておりますが、拡張機能を利用すれば、リモート デスクトップでログインせずとも以下のログを採取する事ができます。 システムとアプリケーションのイベント ログ HTTP エラー ログ IIS ログ セットアップ ログ その他のシステム ログ 採取したログは、指定したストレージ アカウントへ保存されます。 本トピックでは、クラウド サービスを対象としリモート デスクトップでログインを必要としないログ収集ツール AzureLogCollector の使用方法をご紹介いたします。 AzureLogCollector を利用する方法について AzureLogCollector でログを採取する為には、ローカルにインストールされている Microsoft Azure PowerShell からスクリプトを実行します。以下に手順を記載しますのでご参考下さい...(read more)

Pure Native C++ consuming .NET classes without COM registration

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 19:16

 

One of the problems that many C++ native developer face when interacting with .NET is the inability to load a .NET COM Dll and use the COM classes without registering the DLL. I faced this problem when adapting the debugging NetExt from pure C++ to pure C++/.NET. As the idea of an extension is that you just drop it in WinDBG folder and use it, requiring COM class registration in registry for both 32 and 64-bits is a non-starter. As I am using ExtCpp Debugger API, using managed C++ does not work (yes, I tried).

This post will walk you through creating a project where a native C++ calls .NET leveraging the power of object orientation provided by COM. To do so, open Visual Studio (any version) and choose New Project. Make sure you choose a class library. This will be our COM DLL.

Add a reference to System.Windows.Form and remove all unused references, References should look like this:

Change the complete code from Class1.cs to:

using System; using System.Runtime.InteropServices; using System.Windows.Forms;       namespace ContosoCom { [ComVisible(true)] [System.Runtime.InteropServices.InterfaceTypeAttribute(System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComInterfaceType.InterfaceIsIUnknown)] public interface IMyClass { void DisplayMessageBox([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.BStr)] string Text); void GetTicksAndDate([Out] out MyStruct Structure); }   [ComVisible(true)] [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 8)] public struct MyStruct { public long TicksOfNow; public int Day; public int Month; public int Year; }   [ComVisible(true)] [ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.None)] [ComDefaultInterface(typeof(IMyClass))] public class MyClass : IMyClass {   public void DisplayMessageBox(string Text) { MessageBox.Show(Text); }   public void GetTicksAndDate(out MyStruct Structure) { Structure.TicksOfNow = DateTime.Now.Ticks; Structure.Day = DateTime.Now.Day; Structure.Month = DateTime.Now.Month; Structure.Year = DateTime.Now.Year; } } }

 

In order to generate the type library, select the project on Solution Explorer, right-click and choose properties, make sure you include these commands in Post Build Events (change folder “C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v8.1A\bin\NETFX 4.5.1 Tools” to match your API folder):

cd $(TargetDir)
"C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v8.1A\bin\NETFX 4.5.1 Tools"\tlbexp.exe $(TargetPath)
echo xcopy /d /y $(TargetDir)*.*  $(SolutionDir)$(PlatformName)\$(ConfigurationName)\
xcopy /d /y $(TargetDir)*.*  $(SolutionDir)$(PlatformName)\$(ConfigurationName)\

Build the project and look at the output window on Visual Studio (Ctrl+W,O if not visible) because the destination folder of the type library is important to our C++ application.

This is the line of interest:

Assembly exported to 'C:\projects\ContosoCom\ContosoCom\bin\Debug\ContosoCom.tlb'

Now add a new Visual C++ Win32 Console Application project to the existing solution:

In the Wizard leave all options as default and the choose Finish. Now using the information obtained in the Output Window, make sure your code looks like this

// CppTestContoso.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application. //   #include "stdafx.h" #import "C:\projects\ContosoCom\ContosoCom\bin\Debug\ContosoCom.tlb" auto_rename   using namespace ContosoCom; int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) { IMyClass *mc = NULL;   HINSTANCE hDLL = 0; // load the DLL   hDLL = ::LoadLibrary(L"ContosoCom.dll");   ::CoInitialize(NULL);   if(!hDLL) { printf("ERROR: Unable to load library ContosoCom.dll\n"); return -1; } // // TO DO: Add code here to get an instance of MyClass //   // At this point we do not have how to get a pointer even with the libray loaded   // End of TO DO   if(!mc) { printf("ERROR: Unable to get a pointer for MyClass\n"); return -1; }   mc->DisplayMessageBox("Hello World from native to .NET without registration"); MyStruct st; ZeroMemory(&st, sizeof(MyStruct)); printf("SUCCESS: Leaving gracefully\n"); return 0; }  

I believe this is the point everyone stops. I conferred with my colleague Earl Beaman who is the expert on COM/COM+ and he told me that .NET DLLs do not export the necessary method to make the interfaces discoverable, actually they do not export any method as they are not platform specific (bitnesswise). What he did not know is that by giving me this explanation he gave me the response. What if I exported a method to get me the interface (or interfaces)? .NET offers DLLImport to call native code, however there is no DLLExport.

As a matter of fact there is a NuGet developed by the talented Robert Giesecke that does exactly that: it enables a .NET Dll to export methods. Don’t take this lightly, DllExport is an amazing piece of software. As one could expects, it requires the .NET library to compiled choosing a CPU (x86 or x64). So in order to resolve the issue, let’s add DellExport NuGet to our C# project. Select ContosoCom project, go to properties and change the processor target to x86 (you can do the same for 64 bits):

Using Package Manager Console (Tools | NuGet Package Manager | Package Manager Console), run:

Install-Package UnmanagedExports

Let’s create a static class and static method to return the pointer to an instance of MyClass to C++. This is the final code:

using System; using System.Runtime.InteropServices; using System.Windows.Forms; using RGiesecke.DllExport;     namespace ContosoCom {   public static class Exports { [DllExport(CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)] public static void GetClass([Out] [MarshalAs((UnmanagedType.Interface))] out IMyClass pInterface) { pInterface = new MyClass(); } }     [ComVisible(true)] [System.Runtime.InteropServices.InterfaceTypeAttribute(System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComInterfaceType.InterfaceIsIUnknown)] public interface IMyClass { void DisplayMessageBox([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.BStr)] string Text); void GetTicksAndDate([Out] out MyStruct Structure); }   [ComVisible(true)] [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 8)] public struct MyStruct { public long TicksOfNow; public int Day; public int Month; public int Year; }   [ComVisible(true)] [ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.None)] [ComDefaultInterface(typeof(IMyClass))] public class MyClass : IMyClass {   public void DisplayMessageBox(string Text) { MessageBox.Show(Text); }   public void GetTicksAndDate(out MyStruct Structure) { Structure.TicksOfNow = DateTime.Now.Ticks; Structure.Day = DateTime.Now.Day; Structure.Month = DateTime.Now.Month; Structure.Year = DateTime.Now.Year; } } }

Using dumpbin, we see that GetClass method is exported:

 

In the C++ application build I will copy the newest version of the C# dll based on the output of the compilation. In my example this is the command:

xcopy /y C:\projects\ContosoCom\ContosoCom\bin\Debug\ContosoCom.dll $(TargetDir)

 

This is the final C++ code:

// CppTestContoso.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application. //   #include "stdafx.h" #import "C:\projects\ContosoCom\ContosoCom\bin\Debug\ContosoCom.tlb" auto_rename     using namespace ContosoCom; typedef void(*pGetClass)(IMyClass **iMyClass);     int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) { pGetClass getClass = NULL; IMyClass *mc = NULL;   HINSTANCE hDLL = 0; // load the DLL   hDLL = ::LoadLibrary(L"ContosoCom.dll");   ::CoInitialize(NULL);   if(!hDLL) { printf("ERROR: Unable to load library ContosoCom.dll\n"); return -1; }     // // TO DO: Add code here to get an instance of MyClass // getClass = (pGetClass)GetProcAddress(hDLL, "GetClass");   if(!getClass) { printf("ERROR: Unable to find entry for GetClass()\n"); return -1;   }   getClass(&mc);   // At this point we do not have how to get a pointer even with the libray loaded   // End of TO DO   if(!mc) { printf("ERROR: Unable to get a pointer for MyClass\n"); return -1; }   mc->DisplayMessageBox("Hello World from native to .NET without registration"); MyStruct st; ZeroMemory(&st, sizeof(MyStruct)); mc->GetTicksAndDate(&st); printf("Ticks %I64i\n",st.TicksOfNow); printf("Today is %i/%i/%i\n",st.Month,st.Day,st.Year);     printf("SUCCESS: Leaving gracefully\n"); return 0; }  

 

Download project here: .NET COM no registration

Graphics.DrawString メソッドで文字が斜体にならないことがある

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:57

こんにちは、Visual Studio サポート チームです。

今回は、前回ご紹介した「Graphics.DrawString メソッドで游ゴシック・游明朝の文字を縦書きした際の描画位置が OS によって異なる」と同様に、Graphics.DrawString メソッドを利用した際の不具合についてお知らせします。

前回と重複した記載がありますこと、予めご了承ください。

 

現象

Graphics.DrawString メソッドでは、引数の Font クラスに対して、FontStyle.Italic を指定することにより、文字を斜体にすることができます。

しかしながら、FontStyle.Italic と FontStyle.Bold をともに指定した場合、Windows 8 以降の OS では、フォントによっては文字が斜体になりません。

本現象が発生するフォントは、以下の 4 種類です。

  • 游明朝
  • 游明朝 Light
  • 游明朝 Demibold
  • 游ゴシック Light

Windows 7 では、以下のとおりです。

Windows 8 では、以下のとおりです。

 

原因

本現象は、Graphics.DrawString メソッドが内部で利用している GDI+ モジュールとフォントの組み合わせで発生する不具合に起因して発生しています。

弊社製品の不具合によりお客様にご迷惑をおかけしておりますこと、深くお詫び申し上げます。

.NET Framework のバージョンとの関連性はないため、.NET Framework のバージョンに関係なく発生します。

また、本現象に関する GDI+ の動作を変更可能なプロパティやメソッドはないため、回避方法はありません。

マイクロソフトではこの問題を製品の不具合と認識しておりますが、現状では、修正プログラムは提供されておりません。

 

参考

Graphics.DrawString メソッドのほかに、System.Windows.Forms 名前空間にある、TextRenderer.DrawText メソッドでも文字列を描画することができます。

Graphics.DrawString メソッドとの違いは、Graphics.DrawString メソッドが GDI+ を使ってテキスト描画しているのに対して、TextRenderer.DrawText メソッドは GDI を使用している点です。

この違いから、本件のように、GDI+ にて発生する���具合の場合は、TextRenderer.DrawText メソッドでは発生しません。

通常の Graphics.DrowString メソッドの呼び出しであれば、TextRenderer.DrawText メソッドを代わりにご利用いただくことが可能です。

ただ、TextRenderer.DrawText メソッドは、印刷に使用することはできませんのでご注意ください。

Windows 10 上で、MFC の CFileDialog で作成したダイアログを小さくリサイズできない

MSDN Blogs - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 18:45

こんにちは、Platform SDK (Windows SDK) サポートチームです。

今回は、Windows 10 上で、MFC の CFileDialog クラスを利用した場合に、ダイアログのサイズを、小さくリサイズできない現象についてご紹介します。

 

概要

MFC では、「ファイルの保存」、「印刷」等の一般的なダイアログ ボックスをカプセル化したコモンダイアログ クラスが利用可能です。

コモン ダイアログ クラスは、Windows が提供しており、OS の動作に依存します。
このコモン ダイアログ クラスにある、CFileDialog クラスでは、「ファイルを開く」と「名前を付けて保存」ダイアログの二種類のファイルダイアログを表示できます。

CFileDialog クラスを Windows 10 上で利用した場合、ダイアログのサイズを大きくリサイズすることはできますが、小さくすることができません。

- 参考情報

各クラスの詳細については、以下の技術資料をご参照ください。

  コモン ダイアログ クラス
  <https://msdn.microsoft.com/ja-jp/library/5fcd0hw9.aspx>

  CFileDialog クラス
  <https://msdn.microsoft.com/ja-jp/library/dk77e5e7.aspx>

 

状況

現在、弊社開発部門にて、原因詳細について調査中です。

 

対処方法

CFileDialog クラス作成時、Vista スタイル ファイル ダイアログを使用する場合は、本現象は発生しません。

具体的には、CFileDialog::CFileDialog 関数の第八引数に指定できる bVistaStyle を TRUE に設定することによって、対処可能です。

bVistaStyle を変更した場合、ダイアログの見た目については変化はありませんが、bVistaStyle が TRUE の場合は、CFileDialog::SetTemplate 関数が利用できません。

なお、Windows 10 では Visual Studio 2005 をサポートしていませんが、もし、Visual Studio 2005 以前のバージョンで作成した場合、上記 bVistaStyle は存在しないため、有効な対処方法はありません。

 

対象製品

Windows 10

Windows 8.1 以前の OS では本現象は発生しません。

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